But you know one thing for certain: morning will come! C. S. Lewis put it (source unknown, cited in Christianity Today [March 2, 1979], p. 14), “When a man is getting better, he understands more and more clearly the evil that is still in him. How to Explain “Faith” to Sunday School Kids My variation on a common method of teaching faith to kids. The Command to Praise. Thomas Adams put it this way (in Spurgeon, Treasury of David, 7:76, modified into modern English). I knew of guys who would shrug off looking at pornography by saying, “Yeah, I blew it, but I just claimed First John 1:9 and everything is okay now.”. Did you know that God doesn’t create garbage – He creates works of art! His forgiveness does not make you flippant about your sin. As for us adults, it has been so long since we believed in the Permanent Record that the very mention of it now brings a nostalgic smile to our faces. Talk-show hosts would say, “Thank you for being so honest with us. I doubt you could scare a school kid nowadays by telling him that the principal was going to inscribe something on his Permanent Record; the kid would probably file a suit under the Freedom of Information Act and expect to obtain his Permanent Record by recess. We feel naïve for ever having believed there was such a thing. Are modern Christians too flippant about their sin? Because I am a man of unclean lips, and I live among a people of unclean lips; for my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts.” At that moment, Isaiah was in the depths! Fear Him! I have a terrible feeling that mine was the last generation to know what a Permanent Record was—and that it has disappeared as a concept in society. Your sins and lawless deeds He remembers no more! At first glance, this verse seems strange. Psalm 139 is best known for its first verse, which states: Often, those who do not know God assume that everything will be okay on judgment day because, “I’m a basically good person.” But, add up the list of your sins for just the past month, let alone for your lifetime! He titled his autobiography, Out of the Depths [Moody Press]. Read Psalm 139:14-16.. SPOT the Simple Meaning: 1) GOD CREATED YOU AND YOU ARE AMAZING! Praise Him! But the good news of verse 4 is. This psalm also sounds like someone who really needs God to hear them because they are crying from a deep place. And so the psalmist is waiting on God for that sense of His presence. Tell your children that you are going to play a ga… But instantly when he saw God on His throne, with the seraphim crying out (Isa. But the psalmist means, “If the Lord were to tally up all my sins and hold me accountable for them, I’m done. It reminds me of Jonah, crying out to God from the belly of the great fish, after his disobedience to God’s commission to go to Ninevah (Jonah 2:1-9). There are three questions to answer in these verses: What do we wait for? But there is forgiveness with You, that You may be feared.”, The statement of verse 3 raises the question, “Doesn’t God keep a record of all our iniquities?” The answer is, “Yes, He does” (Matt. Adam & Eve Lesson Pretty self-explanatory. Teach the song Deep and Wide. Where is the balance between being too morbid versus too cavalier? 34:6), “The Lord, the Lord God, compassionate and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in lovingkindness and truth.” David, who cites from that text in Psalm 103:8, adds (103:13), “Just as a father has compassion on his children, so the Lord has compassion on those who fear Him.”. So he concludes, “O Israel, hope in the Lord; for with the Lord there is lovingkindness, and with Him is abundant redemption. “If You, Lord, should mark iniquities, O Lord, who could stand? He adds that there is forgiveness with God, and it leads to fear, because without it, you’re doomed. Does God’s forgiveness lead you to fear Him? You might expect to read, “But there is forgiveness with You, that You may be loved.” Or, “There is justice with You, that You may be feared.” Why does he say, “But there is forgiveness with You, that You may be feared”? Here is a Sunday school lesson or Bible study about praise. That’s how we should wait and hope for the renewed sense of the Lord’s presence after we’ve experienced His forgiveness. I could keep going, but you get the idea. This lesson comes from Psalm 139:13-14 and it is designed to teach children that they are wonderfully made. We can’t keep stumbling in the dark with our lives and our problems. The lesson on 01/12/11 where the fear of the Lord was discussed can be found at: Psalm 103:7–18 Fear equals love and compassion. While he could be writing about his earliest experience of God’s forgiveness, when he first came to faith, or about a later time when he fell into some sin, even so as a Jewish young man, growing up with instruction in the Torah, I can’t imagine that he was what most of us would call a “terrible sinner.” And yet, he viewed himself as being in the depths. Deep places beget deep devotion.” Spurgeon cites James Vaughan, (p. 72), who says, “Every one prays; but very few ‘cry.’ But of those who do ‘cry to God,’ the majority would say, ‘I owe it to the depths. 10:28). There is a huge chasm between them, which (as Derek Kidner points out, Psalms 73-150 [IVP], p. 446) self-help cannot answer. They discovered that regardless of how badly you fouled up your life or the lives of others, there was nothing about it on your record. He wants God’s assurance that he is His child. Do you recall how He revealed Himself to Moses, who asked to see His face? OBJECTIVE: Students will learn that a person of integrity avoids the potential disasters that come from lying. “Waiting in Hope” (Psalm 130) “My soul waits for the Lord.” (Psalm 130:6) INTRODUCTION: We have been working our way through the Psalms of Ascent on Sunday mornings (Psalms 120-134). I got an uncomfortable feeling about that, which later came into focus when I read the words of C. H. Spurgeon (Autobiography [Banner of Truth], 1:54), “Too many think lightly of sin, and therefore think lightly of the Savior.” These guys viewed sin so flippantly that they would not have understood what the psalmist meant by verse 4, “But there is forgiveness with You, that You may be feared.” They had never felt that they were in the depths of guilt and so they didn’t fear God when He forgave their sins. There was a time when people really stopped before they did something they knew was deceitful, immoral, or unethical. Preparation: As your children arrive, have a helper help them answer some questions about themselves and write them down on a piece of paper. Scripture: Psalm 137:12; II Chronicles 36:15-23. If you’ve ever stood night watch duty in the military, you look forward to morning when you are relieved of your duty. And that is where we are today. Have you loved God with all your heart, soul, mind, and strength all the time? 130:4), “But there is forgiveness with You, that You may be feared.” Without forgiveness, you’re doomed, but with it, you learn to fear Him. Why must we wait on Him? Lord, who can know You and not love You, know You and not fear You? We knew it was there.…. They stayed awake because at daybreak, they would be set free from their slavery. Without God’s forgiveness, you’re doomed! 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